From The Octavo Blog

Logo Rejects: The Ups and Downs of Logo Design

We came across rejectedlogocompetition.com, a site that aims to celebrate all the logo designs that littered your workspaces and desktop folders but never got chosen to live on in print or on the web. The winner receives not only bragging rights but also vouchers and a variety of great design resources. Here’s what we love about this […]

We came across rejectedlogocompetition.com, a site that aims to celebrate all the logo designs that littered your workspaces and desktop folders but never got chosen to live on in print or on the web. The winner receives not only bragging rights but also vouchers and a variety of great design resources.

Here’s what we love about this concept: as design professionals, we know how much effort goes into creating not only the perfect logo design, but also the dozens (yes, some days it feels like thousands!) of variations of it.

While the ultimate goal is, without question, to please the client and create something they will love whole-heartedly, this goal is not met without trust between the client and the designer. Trust is built when the client reviews the options and sees how their specifications come to fruition the way they imagine it in their minds. The trick is to match your headspace to theirs, and we all know it is no easy feat.

The minute we have the consultation conversation with the client and review their logo design surveys, we put pen to paper or cursor to program and get moving. We talk with our coworkers and throw around ideas so that after we deliberate we can supply three polished logo design concepts that reflect not only the range of what the client offers but also the range within our team. The variety with which we approach a design concept expands our own reach and allows us to consider new things—even if it’s just a new color palette or line weight. We love having “Hey, that works!” conversations in our office, when we feel proud of how what was just a conversation has taken on this exciting, visual form.

Example of three polished logo design concepts

It is important not to lose this sense of excitement, even if the client selects what you, as a team, consider the weakest of the three options. There will be times when the strongest typeface or most dynamic illustration will be set aside because what registers as “NAILED IT!” in our minds might ring in at “I’m not so sure…” in a client’s mind. The image they hold onto in their heads is planted just as firmly as the one we have in ours—and that’s just the way it pans out on occasion.

        

Octavo Designs

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